Hardwood Dining Table from Recycled Pallets

Today I am going to start another project making a dining table setting from recycled hardwood pallets. This will be for sale when its finished!

The idea I am going for is a rustic looking setting with two bench seats, keeping it small and solid.

My target buyer is possibly a small family or couple who are looking for a small space saving table for perhaps in a unit/townhouse with not much space.

The timber I will be using is 70 x 70 x 1220mm pieces also know as gluts. They are commonly used to space the pallets off the ground so a forklift can get under it for example.

Since I have been making this blog and small furniture projects I have only been using the long 60 x 45 x 2400 sticks so the ‘glut’ pile has been sitting there until now. Time to create!

aNot a very good photo, but this was the box full of unwanted gluts. Should have got a pic before I started.

bHere they are laid out on the flat cement ground. Since the timbers aren’t exactly the same size I need to build this upside down so they are all flat on the top and uneven on the bottom. If that makes sense.

cCutting the support braces.

eNext was to fabricate the steel support braces. Here they are drilled and countersunk. The back one is raw steel the front two have the first coat of clear on them to stop them rusting.

dHere are the legs sanded and almost ready to whack on.

FullSizeRenderPre-drilling and countersinking the legs.

FullSizeRender (1) Here’s a shot of me attaching the steel supports to the top.  Note because the timbers are various thicknesses they had to be packed so they remain flat on the top when turned over.

fBraces on, now to attach the legs.

gThe legs were then drilled and bolted on using cup-head coach bolts.

hLeg supports all done. Screwed together using countersunk batton screws. Last thing to do now is attach the end pieces to hide all the end grains.

iHere’s the end pieces sanded and drilled ready to go on.

jThat’s the table finished!

kNow to start the chairs!

FullSizeRenderHeres the timber for the chairs, the straightest ones i have left without any splits or knots.

FullSizeRender (1)Using offcuts to join the pieces together, screwed from underneath with countersunk baton screws.

FullSizeRender (2)

FullSizeRender (4)Here i am having a play around deciding on the height of the chairs.

IMG_442191922Ok! here it is done! I have missed a few photos of welding the legs and painting them, Since I screwed it all together its also been oiled using  tongue oil.

IMG_442191918 IMG_442191931 IMG_442191922 IMG_442191985 IMG_442191943 IMG_442191938 IMG_442192142 IMG_442191910

So there it is. Done.

Its a perfect little 4 seater. Would suit a couple living in a unit or apartment as a convenient dining table or on a deck or something. Its solid and bloody heavy. There’s not many tables these days that are made like this, to last.

Hope you enjoyed the read and don’t forget to subscribe!

 

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Beer Keg BBQ / Grille

So I like making things from beer kegs. So what.

Their cheap (usually free), universal and made from stainless steel. A great platform for a cooking device. Very Australian and will last forever, never rust, nothing to break, easy to transport, the list goes on.

In this post I will be making a coal fueled bbq/grille from a brand spanking keg. Nothing special, just a reliable cool bbq / smoker built to last.

IMG_5514Here’s the keg. Brand spanking new, never used.  Time for the chop!

IMG_5527So I have cut it in half and fabricated some simple legs to keep it 50mm off the ground, stable and level.

IMG_5526 The rear of the legs will also act as a rest for the lid when open.

IMG_5528Using simple stainless door hinges I then cut them down and welded them on.

IMG_5525This is me making the grill from 8mm stainless round bar.

IMG_5608Clamping the grill to the table to keep it straight while welding.

IMG_5610As you can see, a lot of welding/heat.

IMG_5788Here’s the grill fully TIG welded and polished.  Ready for business.

 

IMG_5789The 2mm stainless coal tray done. Its sitting off the keg by around 30mm this will stop the outside getting hot and burning the deck or grass etc. Also allowing  a little air flow.

IMG_5790Here are the air flow control vents. You could say the bottom one lets the air in to fuel the coals and the top can be used to trap the heat or smoke if you are using it for smoking.

IMG_5785The finished product. Ready to go.

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Thanks for reading.  I hope you enjoyed it.

 

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