Tag Archives: how to

DIY 4WD Box Trailer

 

After building my slide on camper,  (seen here) Slide on camper I have decided to build tough little box trailer to complement it.

This way I have the option to either put the camper on my ute as previously or tow it behind on the new trailer. It will also enable people to use the camper if they don’t own a utility or a potential buyer who wants the whole package!

The reason to build a trailer over buying one are a plenty, this way I get exactly what I want and save a few dollars in the process. Also my dad has been wanting a new trailer for decades and thought it would be nice if I built one we could both use. And to no cost to him.

Its going to be quite small, have heavy duty 1600kg 4WD suspension, 33″ 4WD tyres (Cooper ST MAX’s), made from galvanized steel, have an internal box storage size to perfectly fit 4 x 900 x 500 x 400 Pelican space cases, and the top made to the same size as the camper so when its paired it will work and look awesome.

This is my story,

IMG_8611Like all ideas of mine, they begin their fruition on a piece of paper. Starting with rough sketches of what comes pouring out of my mind the design slowly takes shape.

IMG_8613Putting dimensions on sketches gives me parameters to work with, like a limit to what I can do within the space and also the goal or reason for build.  In this case, the tray top needs to match the camper so 2050 x 1850  is the ideal size.

IMG_8612I would like the inner box compartment to fit my pelican space cases which measure 900 x 550 x 400 each so an internal size under the camper of 1800L x 1100W x 400H min.

IMG_8641Next is to get a bit more serious. Without going into too much detail using Autocad and drafting up proper drawings, this one has all i need to do the job. From this drawing i have also worked out the wheelbase and most importantly the axle length which i can now order to get made to size.

IMG_8642Here we have the side elevation above and below an isometric view of the parts for the frame/chassis with part numbers. From this drawing I can start cutting the lengths of tube up.

IMG_8603Next step was to get cracking! Here we have the box section chassis made from 40 x 40 x 2.5 Duragal SHS tacked together. All cut from that crappy drawing above. No CAD necessary.

IMG_8807There’s the frame fully welded and the tailgate made and installed. Its upside down by the way,

IMG_8808My Christmas has come early!  Got a delivery today. The hardware!

IMG_8810Basically everything i need to make a trailer. Minus the wiring , lights wheels etc.

IMG_8812A few late hours later I have welded the hangers and installed the shackles, fitted the springs and are now fitting the custom made axle.

IMG_8813Axle on, electric brake hub on.

IMG_8814Getting excited!  (i am only dry fitting the bearings tonight as I need to borrow a bearing grease packer off a friend tomorrow

IMG_8834Prepared earlier, was a new set of Cooper ST-Maxx.’s 33″ on 17″ steel rims.

IMG_8819Wheel on, mudguard just sitting in there at this stage. Its looking pretty good, so far the dimensions are matching the sketch. Almost ready to make the draw bar and flip it over.

IMG_8829Draw bar on. Making it quite long as its easier to reverse, able to jack-knife for turning around on tight 4WD tracks and also my to point under my ute is a fair way under the tray.

IMG_8835On its wheels. Tail gate done!.

IMG_8837There it is, the rolling chassis.

IMG_8836Looking at how the height came together i think its a bit high, from here I will take the axle out again and put it on top of the leaf springs which will lower it about 130mm.

IMG_8955There thats better. see how the wheel is more inside the mudguard now. Also checking to make sure the pelican cases fit.

IMG_9137Mudguards painted, now to fit the gal sheet metal.

IMG_9138Im going to use a 2mm gal sheet for the bottom and 1.5mm for the sides to reduce the weight a bit.

IMG_9149Sheet metal done.  It has been stitch welded on so there is no rivets or screws then every seam and join i have used a flexible sickaflex 11FC to keep the edges from collecting dirt and water and rusting out. Its will be painted over later on.


 

So,  I have missed taking a few photos of wiring the lights and finishing painting etc but she’s finished now.

As you can see in the pics below, its great all rounder, versatile solid trailer great for any purpose. Unbreakable and rustproof. With electric brakes and heavy duty 4wd suspension its a pleasure to tow and forget its even there sometimes.

IMG_9204

 

Next up is to mount the slide on camper on top and see how she goes.


Here’s a few photos of my slide on camper mounted on the trailer. These two pair up perfectly and giving me ultimate versatility to either tow it and leave the ute tray empty, put the camper on my ute for a bit more remote travelling or just using the box trailer as a good all-rounder and leave the camper on its legs.

2015-10-10 12.17.16_result

2015-10-10 12.52.26_result

2015-09-30 07.32.57_result

2015-11-08 13.22.03_result

2015-10-07 12.14.25_result

2015-11-08 13.36.03_result

 

Thanks for reading and stay tuned for more interesting projects to come!.

Next up:  Turning that trailer into the ultimate off road camper!!

If you want to see the slide on camper build.  See it here!

Lean-to Campers Hideaway

Camping is great fun all year around. By the ocean/beach is nice during summer and just as good in the bush throughout winter.

This post is about a little place in the woods me and my mate like to visit in the colder months, get away, turn our phones off and enjoy cooking dinner over the fire and a few cold beers.

Since we visit this area often we decided one weekend to build a little lean-to out of mostly natural resources. This is our story.

IMG_0656With breakfast cooking over the fire we chose this location. Its quite flat, accessible by 4WD, bush/trees not too thick and a semi-running stream nearby.

IMG_0657

 

 

IMG_0661From locally sourced trees, we scoured the property for the straightest ones we could find.

IMG_0660This spot looks good.

IMG_0658

 

IMG_0662Took us all day in the  trusty truck to find enough for the job.

IMG_0663Starting with these two forked pieces just to give a bit of room inside and to keep the lengths off the ground.

IMG_0665

 

IMG_0666Getting there.

IMG_0667So she’s starting to take shape now and the sun is starting to set.

IMG_0668

IMG_0670Here we attached a tarp to the roof for rain purposes.

IMG_0673With a little gutter set up at the back using a log and a bucket for catchment.

IMG_0723All in a days work. Time to light the fire and crack a cold one.

IMG_0692

 

Hope you enjoyed the read, Please show your support and write a comment below and subscribe for future projects.,

 

Hardwood Sleeper Dining Table

With my love for restoring old hardwood timber, I decided to build a dining table / bench seat arrangement for home. This would soon be one of those pieces of furniture you keep for life. The thought of where these sleepers had come from in their past life, being out in the weather with years of punishing abuse from trains, and how with a bit of TLC they would soon be brought to life again.

I hope you enjoy the read and don’t forget to subscribe by pressing the follow button at the bottom right of this page!

P1010957So, this is what i have bought-10 used sleepers. Half Ironbark and half something else. Straight up, I had them sent to a huge sawmill to be split down the middle. There’s no way i could have done this myself without a lot of effort.

IMG_2402After taking off the outer skin and docking them to length this is what i had to work with. As you can see in the background, the off-cuts i would use for a matching coffee table.

IMG_2404 IMG_2405After choosing my pieces and arranging the way they sat with the old bolt holes etc now for the gluing.

IMG_2414 IMG_2416Here we are gluing the pieces together.

Table with top offNext was the frame design. I had designed the legs for easy removal with a wider footprint for good balance.

Table TopNext was to design where to rout out the underside of the top for the frame to nest into. This was probably not necessary but I did it anyway.

IMG_2495Here is the table top with the groove cut into it for the stainless steel frame.

P1020286The frame and legs assembled.

P1020284 P1020285

IMG_2485 IMG_2486The table finally sanded flat, all bolt holes have been filled with resin.

IMG_2489I put a bit of an angle on the bench seats so its not so uncomfortable to sit on.

IMG_2493 IMG_2494 IMG_2490Then the timber was oiled with tongue oil.

P1020300 The bases for the chairs ready to go on.

IMG_2580The finished table.

Sorry no recent photo has been taken with the table lately. To date the table has has brought us many good times with good company. Solid as a rock and something i will keep forever.

Thanks for reading!

 

[ssm_form id=’636′]

 

 

 

Hardwood Sleeper Coffee Table with Polished Concrete Top

Coffee tables are fun projects to build. They aren’t very big, easy to manage alone, fairly cheap to build and a good platform for your imagination.

This time I have decided to go for that industrial look with big heavy hardwood railway sleepers and a custom made polished concrete top with a wrought iron edge.

I hope you enjoy the read and don’t forget to subscribe by pressing the follow button at the bottom right of this page!

IMG_4507On the outside these sleepers look old and shitty but under the skin lies perfectly good flawless hardwood.

IMG_4523The table is held together with a stainless steel square tube frame I TIG welded together. As you can see the sleepers are back screwed to hide the fixings.

IMG_4506After cutting them to length, I arranged the sleepers in a way that shows off the beautiful ageing and patina they have. The packers are there while I screw them from the back. The finished look will be one of them floating.

IMG_4511IMG_4512After a quick scrub it was time to oil the sleepers.

IMG_4723Next was the concrete top. Well after some trial and error i have decided against concrete all together and am now going to use structural non-shrink grout. It is a shitload harder and finer. There will be no sand in it so the finish will come out more like highly polished concrete or that of polished stone. The difference the way i will be pouring this slab is i am doing it upside down. As in once its dry, the bottom molded side will be the top. In this picture the mold i have made from 18mm MDF whiteboard. The stuff your kitchen cupboards are made of. Its only temporary as long as its smooth. Remember, the inside size of the mold will be the outside of the shape you want. The depth of the mold will be the finished height of the slab.

IMG_4727 IMG_4725 IMG_4726Siv, mix and pour. If you are using non-shrink grout, mix it up pretty runny for a better finish. The water will just dry out of it anyway.

IMG_4731Once you have filled the mold, why its still wet, use a straight edge to screed off the excess giving you the desired thickness.

IMG_4734Done. Pour a slab, drink a slab.

photo 1There’s the dry slab, ready to break out of the mold.

photo 2Here is the sheet of 18mm form ply I will be using as a sub-straight under the slab. this will stop any distortion causing the slab to crack. Notice I am using a product called Hexa Birch ply. Expensive shit but it has that hexagon pattern which will help bond the two surfaces.

photo 3On goes the glue. I’m using sikaflex Pro 11fc.

photo 4This is me coating the cement top with a non porous protective film sealer. Its called siloxane. Bloody expensive shit. Was around $60P/L  from memory.

photo 5This is the finished top with the sealer dried. Notice how the water now beads off and the cement remains dry! This will be great later on for things like red wine or food spillages.

 

photo 4Now for the table edge/perimeter. Im going to use this 50x50x8 Steel angle. The idea is for the table top to sit inside the angle protecting the edge from hits.

photo 2The steel angle frame i whipped up, to support and protect the edge of the cement top.

IMG_4895Ok, the steel frame has since been powder coated clear (to stop it rusting and also so it feels smooth and you cant get dirty fingers by touching it.) As you can see, i had to route out the bottom of the form ply by 2mm so the top edge of the steel is flush with the top of cement top. A small miscalculation, easily fixed.IMG_4894

IMG_4897The final touches. Here i am packing out the gaps around the edge evenly, then caulk the gap with black sikaflex.

IMG_4916The finished job. !

IMG_4917

IMG_4919

IMG_4920

 

 

[ssm_form id=’636′]